Loading...

Marine Still Life

Oil on canvas
24 1/8 x 36 1/8 inches
1953
Work on loan: Dixon Gallery & Gardens, Memphis, Tennessee

As published in:
Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists in the Johnson Collection
Southern/Modern: Rediscovering Southern Art from the First Half of the Twentieth Century

As exhibited in:
Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists in the Johnson Collection, 20182021, Georgia Museum of Art, Athens; Mississippi Museum of Art, Jackson; Huntington Museum of Art, West Virginia; Dixon Gallery and Gardens, Memphis, Tennessee; Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston, South Carolina; Wofford College, Spartanburg, South Carolina; Taubman Museum of Art, Roanoke, Virginia

Southern/Modern: Rediscovering Southern Art from the First Half of the Twentieth Century, 2023–2024, Georgia Museum of Art, Athens, 2023, Frist Art Museum, Nashville, Tennessee, 2024, Dixon Gallery & Gardens, Memphis, Tennessee, 2024

For many twentieth century artists, Cubism was a powerful and pervasive influence, and this is especially true for those educated abroad. Edith London first embraced the style during her years in Paris when she was a student of André Lhote. Painted well after that time, Marine Still Life demonstrates Cubism’s main tenets: a flattened, non-perspectival handling of space, overlapping angular shapes, and a penchant for abstracting objects. London’s exposure to art began as a child in Berlin; with the ascendancy of Nazism, her family immigrated to the United States, settling in Durham, North Carolina. The painter’s passion for her chosen profession never waned: “My artistic work allows me to follow one of the most lofty pursuits in the field of human endeavor.” -- Southern/Modern: Rediscovering Southern Art from the First Half of the Twentieth Century, 2023–2024

Other works by this artist